DAILY DIGEST: Project underway in the Yolo Bypass to prevent straying of adult salmon; Water worries persist for agriculture; Kelley Twomey Sanders on water in a changing climate; Report questions safety of oil field wastewater on food crops; and more …

In California water news today, Project underway in the Yolo Bypass to prevent straying of adult salmon; Water worries persist for agriculture; Kelley Twomey Sanders on water in a changing climate; Report questions safety of oil field wastewater on food crops; Water treatment, reuse: An $11 billion opportunity for water tech companies; and more …

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On the calendar today …

  • On Friday, State Water Board staff will be holding a public meeting to discuss draft fee concepts for purposes of Sustainable Groundwater Management Act implementation at 1:30pm.  Click here for more information.

In the news today …

Project underway in the Yolo Bypass to prevent straying of adult salmon: Yet another hazard to migratory salmon will disappear soon, when local, state, and federal officials finish building a permanent, fish-friendly weir in the Yolo Bypass.  The Wallace Weir Fish Rescue project, located four miles northwest of Woodland and near Knights Landing, will help prevent adult Sacramento River salmon from swimming into a drainage ditch that leads deep into farm fields where spawning is hopeless. … ” Read more from the Daily Democrat here:  Project underway in the Yolo Bypass to prevent straying of adult salmon

Water worries persist for agriculture:  “Uncertainty continues to swirl around water-related issues facing West Side agriculture.  In the wake of a uniquely challenging summer when the supply of federal water in San Luis Reservoir was virtually exhausted, providers of irrigation water are looking ahead in anticipation of what 2017 may bring.  Officials with the Central California Irrigation District, an exchange contractor with strong water rights, and the much smaller Del Puerto Water District, a federal water district running along the I-5 corridor, expect challenges to continue.  Anthea Hansen, general manager of the Del Puerto district, recently told Mattos Newspapers that all indications are the district will not receive an allocation of surface water from the federal Central Valley Project next year. ... ”  Read more from Westside Connect here:  Water worries persist for agriculture

Meet the minds: Kelley Twomey Sanders on water in a changing climate:  “California’s drought has helped the public see what many researchers have known for a long time: Water and energy are deeply intertwined. Kelly Twomey Sanders has been exploring this energy-water nexus in depth. She joined the Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Southern California in 2014 after having completed her PhD at the University of Texas.  Sanders is working to identify the technical, market and regulatory interventions that can help reduce water-related disruptions to energy services in the context of a changing climate. “Climate change is altering the quantity, timing and quality of our water resources, and that can undermine the reliability and safety of our energy infrastructure,” Sanders told Water Deeply.  She recently spoke with Water Deeply about planning for water management in a world of climate change and why we should be committing to conservation. ... ”  Read more from Water Deeply here:  Meet the minds: Kelley Twomey Sanders on water in a changing climate

Report questions safety of oil field wastewater on food crops:  “The aquifer and food crops in California’s Central Valley may be tainted with chemicals from nearby oil fields, according to a new report.  Researchers from four institutions, including Lawrence Berkeley Labs, looked at 173 chemicals used in oil and gas production and found that more than 100 have been flagged in the federal chemical database for acute toxicity, biodegradability, and environmental persistence. Ten are considered carcinogenic or are suspected of causing cancer. Patrick Sullivan, climate media specialist at the Center for Biological Diversity, said the waste water, also known as produced water, could be finding its way into the food and water supply. … ” Read more from the Public News Service here:  Report questions safety of oil field wastewater on food crops

Water treatment, reuse: An $11 billion opportunity for water tech companies: Water technology companies received good news — an a likely boost in business — from a recent California report that concludes it is feasible to develop uniform water recycling regulations for direct potable reuse in the state.  This means the drought-stricken state can move forward with its plans to use recycled water, or treated sewage, for drinking water. Currently it’s only used for non-potable purposes such as agriculture and irrigation.  It also means that the demand for advanced water treatment technologies such as micro filtration, reverse osmosis and UV disinfection systems will grow. ... ”  Read more from Environmental Leader here:  Water treatment, reuse: An $11 billion opportunity for water tech companies

In commentary today …

Winnemem Wintu journey highlights struggling California fisheries, says Chief Caleen Sisk:  She writes, “In September my people, the Winnemem Wintu, embarked on a 300-mile (480km) journey to bring attention to the policies threatening our waters, our fish and our way of life. Joined by a collective of Indigenous women, activists and friends, we traced the historic route of our sacred salmon from the San Francisco Bay Delta to their ancestral homeland in the McCloud River north of Redding, California. The rivers and tributaries that served as the pathway home for the winter-run chinook have been blocked, drained and diverted over seven decades of destructive California water mismanagement. So we did not swim – instead we covered the winding miles in our Run4Salmon in stretches by boat, by foot, on bicycles and by horseback.  … ”  Read more Water Deeply here:  Winnemem Wintu journey highlights struggling California fisheries

Time to stop the backsliding on water conservation, says the Sacramento Bee:  They write, “The drought persists. This summer was the hottest on record. Last month, a National Weather Service meteorologist called the chance of adequate winter rainfall this year “a crapshoot.”  Farmers in the Central Valley are pumping groundwater like there’s no tomorrow. And they may not be wrong; it’s not for nothing that the rest of the world ratified the Paris climate accord on Wednesday.  Thank heaven Californians finally have gotten serious about water conservation – oh, wait. ... ” Read more from the Sacramento Bee here:  Time to stop the backsliding on water conservation

Prediction for the new year: Uncertain, says the Appeal-Democrat:  They write: “Happy new year!  New water year, that is. Oct. 1 was the first day of the water year; here’s hoping it’s much wetter, but not too much wetter. We want normal snowpack and normal reservoir levels and aquifers recharged. We don’t want flooding. If only the weather could come as ordered … A water year is a 12-month period of time during which precipitation totals are measured. The water year runs from Oct. 1 to Sept. 30 and is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. So we’re now into the 2017 water year. ... ”  Continue reading from the Appeal-Democrat here:  Prediction for the new year: Uncertain

In regional news and commentary today …

Spirit of Sacramento recovery totaled $1.6 million: The Coast Guard and partnering agencies have finished the cleanup of the capsized Spirit of Sacramento, and the price has come out to $1.6 million in damages for a boat that was sold at auction for $1,000.  Global Diving and Salvage, Inc. removed approximately 130 gallons of oily water mixture from the boat at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers facility in Sausalito on Friday.  The Spirit of Sacramento, an 85-foot steel-hulled paddle-wheeler built in 1967, has been transferred over to the hands of the Environmental Protection Agency, which will complete the final cleanup. … ”  Read more from the Mercury News here:  Spirit of Sacramento recovery totaled $1.6 million

San Joaquin County reports half billion dollars lost in agricultural production: More than half a billion dollars…that’s how much San Joaquin County lost in farm production last year. The drought and lower prices were to blame.  The prices for milk, almonds, walnuts, and grapes dropped in 2015 and those commodities make up 70 percent of San Joaquin County’s agricultural worth. … ”  Read more from Capital Public Radio here:  San Joaquin County reports half billion dollars lost in agricultural production

Bakersfield: Scientists take to the air to look for water under the ground:  “A low-flying helicopter is circling above the community of Lost Hills, checking for water below the ground.  The flights are being done by U.S. Geological Survey researchers on behalf of state water officials, and the work will continue next near Buttonwillow.  Officials say they’re developing 3D maps of where there’s fresh and salty groundwater in certain oil field areas in the state. The first phase of that big project is the work underway in Kern County. ... ”  Read more from Bakersfield Now here:  Scientists take to the air to look for water under the ground

Drought forces Mount Wilson observatory to tap out: From the dusty riverbeds of the L.A. basin to the peak of Mount Wilson observatory, the drought has hit everyone.  Officials say the iconic telescope site atop the San Gabriel Mountains has run out of water and shut off the tap – that is, there will no more flush toilets and no more water fountains at the Mt. Wilson observatory summit, as of the weekend starting Friday.  That means the steady stream of hikers and stargazers who visit the mountaintop will need to tote in their own water. ... ”  Read more from KPCC here:  Drought forces Mount Wilson observatory to tap out

Steve Lopez column:  Her $16,988.62 DWP bill sent this retired teacher to the emergency room: The story I’m about to tell does not quite match the one two years ago about Stella and Savely Goreshter, the Van Nuys condo dwellers who lived in dread after receiving a Los Angeles Department of Water and Power bill for $51,649.32.  But it ain’t bad.  Mrs. Velma Matthews, a retired schoolteacher who lives in Northridge with her dog, Precious, says her bills from the LADWP usually run in the $500 range every two-month billing period.  But in July, she got one on steroids. … ”  Continue reading at the LA Times here:  Her $16,988.62 DWP bill sent this retired teacher to the emergency room

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

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