DAILY DIGEST: Water recycling spikes demand for state loans; Since La Nina is a no-show, does that give us hope for rain this winter?; River flow proposal to be discussed in Turlock, Sacramento; California farmers invited to move to Oklahoma; and more …

In California water news today, Water recycling spikes demand for state loans; How cash strapped utilities can finance infrastructure; Since La Nina is a no-show, does that give us hope for rain this winter?; Chico: ‘Urban oasis’ Teichert Ponds shaping up, but funds still scarce; Yuba County: Water wars: YCWA vs. Cordua Irrigation; Sonoma County beavers are watershed heroes; River flow proposal to be discussed in Turlock, Sacramento; Backers to travel to Washington to push Temperance Flat; How drought affects the health of Morro Bay; Santa Barbara County supervisors to discuss adding to water supply; Why lakes in the San Bernardino Mountains are shrinking; And lastly … California farmers invited to move to Oklahoma
Maven’s Notebook wants to make sure it is providing you with the service and content you value most. Please take a few moments to complete a very short survey.  Click here to take the survey.  Your input is greatly appreciated. Thank you!

In the news today …

Water recycling spikes demand for state loans:  “A low-interest loan program that supports California water projects has seen three times more requests for money than it has funds available, partly because of surging interest in water recycling.  The Clean Water State Revolving Fund exists to help local agencies pay for wastewater treatment plant upgrades, stormwater capture and wildlife habitat projects that improve water quality. Eighty percent of the money in the fund comes from federal appropriations via the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the remainder from state appropriations.  A separate Drinking Water State Revolving Fund provides grants and loans for drinking water treatment and supply projects. ... ”  Read more from Water Deeply here:  Water recycling spikes demand for state loans

How cash strapped utilities can finance infrastructure:  “Is there an answer for the rising cost of improving the nation’s water and wastewater infrastructure?  Patricia Buckley, director for economic policy and analysis at Deloitte, addressed the question plaguing municipalities and water companies across the country in a recent podcast released by her firm. She noted that water main breaks in the U.S. cost about $2.6 billion dollars per year, which is multiplied many times over as a total cost to the economy since businesses and households have to pay for damages.  Buckley delivered the bad news first: “There’s no simple solution.”  Nevertheless, she offered a number of options that may be helpful. ... ”  Read more from Water Online here:  How cash strapped utilities can finance infrastructure

Since La Nina is a no-show, does that give us hope for rain this winter?  “It’s an infamous milestone at best.  Friday marked the end of the California water year. The fifth consecutive year of the drought is officially in the books.  Some measure calendar years, others fiscal years. But the state Department of Water Resources measures water years from Oct. 1 through Sept. 30. This governmental machination aside, the point remains the same: We have had five years of drought.  What’s next?  I asked Bill Patzert, the climatologist with the biggest media presence since Dallas Raines, to put on his forecast hat. Here’s some of what he had to say … ”  Read more from the Whittier Daily News here:  Since La Nina is a no-show, does that give us hope for rain this winter?

Chico: ‘Urban oasis’ Teichert Ponds shaping up, but funds still scarce:  “On a sunny, warm afternoon in early September, dragonflies danced about the ponds in central Chico as frogs sat still, soaking in the mud. Butterflies flickered through the brush, and oak trees generously shaded the well-trodden dirt path meandering through the urban oasis.  Teichert Ponds awaits just off Highway 99, accessible from the bike path between Humboldt Road and the Kohl’s shopping center. Though the 40-acre spot technically functions as a storm water drainage facility for the city, it’s also an accidental wetland, a flooded gravel pit. … ”  Read more from the Chico Enterprise-Record here:  Chico: ‘Urban oasis’ Teichert Ponds shaping up, but funds still scarce

Yuba County: Water wars: YCWA vs. Cordua Irrigation:  “In addition to two pending lawsuits worth millions of dollars regarding water transfers, representatives from both the Yuba County Water Agency and Cordua Irrigation District disagree on a plethora of issues. While water rights are the central issue, the dispute boils down to much more than who has the priority to the natural resource.  Charlie Mathews, chairman of Cordua’s board, said he believes the agency wants full control over all of the water in the Yuba River.  “The agency wants complete control of the water rights and the ability to do anything,” Mathews said. “They don’t want a district to have any ability to do things for themselves. We’ve been around a lot longer than the agency.” … ”  Read more from the Appeal Democrat here:  Water wars: YCWA vs. Cordua Irrigation  (Note: This is part 3 of 3 in a series; see weekend Daily Digest for parts 1 and 2)

Sonoma County beavers are watershed heroes:  “In this, the driest part of the year in Sonoma County, you might take a minute to consider creatures that are increasingly appreciated as watershed heroes — the beavers.  Beavers (Castor canadensis) are aquatic mammals that live in streams and lakes and are well known for building dams and lodges, but they have long been misunderstood, ignored or maligned.  Today, however, scientists and land managers recognize them as a “keystone” species, protecting habitat for many other plants and animals, and providing water security for people. … ”  Continue reading at the Santa Rosa Press Democrat here:  Sonoma County beavers are watershed heroes

River flow proposal to be discussed in Turlock, Sacramento:  “The board of the Turlock Irrigation District will get its turn Tuesday to denounce the river flow increases proposed by the state.  Later in the morning in Sacramento, supporters and opponents of higher flows will speak to the California State Board of Food and Agriculture. TID board member Michael Frantz will take part in this meeting, which can be viewed online.  The lower Stanislaus, Tuolumne and Merced river flows would roughly double from February through June under the Sept. 15 proposal from the State Water Resources Control Board. … ”  Read more from the Modesto Bee here:  River flow proposal to be discussed in Turlock, Sacramento

Backers to travel to Washington to push Temperance Flat: Members of the San Joaquin Valley Water Infrastructure Authority, which include Avenal Mayor Pro Tem Alvaro Preciado, Tulare County Supervisor Steve Worthley and Fresno Supervisor Buddy Mendes, will travel to Washington Oct. 4-5 to push for funding for Temperance Flat reservoir. … ”  Read more from the Visalia Times-Delta here:  Backers to travel to Washington to push Temperance Flat

How drought affects the health of Morro Bay:  “The last year the Central Coast received above-average rainfall was way back in 2010.  Since then, San Luis Obispo County, as well as other Central and Southern California counties, has been mired in a six-year drought.  The most recent rain so far this year in San Luis Obispo County was April 22, when a storm near the San Juan Islands drove a cold front through our area and produced one-tenth of an inch of precious precipitation at Diablo Canyon Power Plant’s rain gauge. As of Sunday, that’s 164 straight days without a drop, except for periods of night and morning mist and drizzle. ... ”  Read more from the San Luis Obispo Tribune here:  How drought affects the health of Morro Bay

Santa Barbara County supervisors to discuss adding to water supply: With the capacity of Lake Cachuma at a record low of 7-percent capacity, the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday will hear a timely report on the status of the various water supplies in the county and what actions have been taken since last year to supplement those supplies.  The elected officials also will be asked to approve adding state water to the county’s drought buffer as California heads into what could be a fifth straight year of little to no rain.  … ”  Read more from the Santa Maria Times here:  Santa Barbara County supervisors to discuss adding to water supply

Why lakes in the San Bernardino Mountains are shrinking: There was a blue heron a few yards away from the Big Bear Marina.  Mallards played in the water near the marina’s office.  “This is pretty sad looking,” said Scott Ruppel, 60, as he sat in front of the marina office on a recent weekday morning.  A frequent lake visitor, Ruppel, a Barstow resident, talked about the grass and other plant life — some green, some not — growing on land once covered by a 3,000 acre lake. … ”  Read more from the Daily News here:  Why lakes in the San Bernardino Mountains are shrinking

And lastly … California farmers invited to move to Oklahoma: In John Steinbeck’s “The Grapes of Wrath,” a family of impoverished, tenant farmers flee Oklahoma and its drought and dust for greener pastures in California.  Today, as California farmers grapple with their own drought and tougher government regulations, Oklahoma lawmakers hope to write a new, happier ending to the haunting tale.  Their version has thousands of California farmers packing up and heading back east to now-bountiful farmland.  For the first time in history, Oklahoma is preparing an aggressive marketing and recruitment campaign to lure away California farmers and ranchers, said state Rep. Scott Biggs, R-Chickasha. … ”  Read more from The Norman Transcript: California farmers invited to move to Oklahoma

In commentary today …

Climate change and the astrobiology of the Anthropocene:  Adam Frank writes, “You can’t solve a problem until you understand it. When it comes to climate change, on a fundamental level we don’t really understand the problem.  For some time now, I’ve been writing about the need to broaden our thinking about climate. That includes our role in changing it — and the profound challenges those changes pose to our rightly cherished “project” of civilization.  Today, I want to sharpen the point.  But first, as always, let’s be clear: We have not gotten the science wrong. The Earth’s climate is changing because of human activity. That part has been well-established for awhile now, in spite of the never ending — and always depressing — faux “climate debate” we get in politics.  But the part of climate change we’ve failed to culturally metabolize is the meaning of what’s happening to us and the planet. ... ”  Continue reading at NPR here:  Climate change and the astrobiology of the Anthropocene

More news and commentary in the weekend edition …

DAILY DIGEST, weekend edition: Timber company tells California town, go find your own water; Happy Droughtiversary, California!; Brown signs water projects bill aiding Friant-Kern farmers; and more, plus early season weather system moves through NorCal

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

Sign up for daily email service and you’ll never miss a post …

Daily emailsSign up for free daily email service and you’ll get all the Notebook’s aggregated and original water news content delivered to your email box by 9AM. And with breaking news alerts, you’ll always be one of the first to know …


About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: