News Worth Noting: New PPIC Survey on Californians and the environment; Dropcountr is asking for your feedback; Notice of Proposed Emergency Regulatory Action – Groundwater Sustainability Plans and Alternatives

New PPIC Survey finds fewer are worried about water, but it’s still top environmental issue

From the Public Policy Institute of California:

PPIC logo goodWhat is the most important environmental issue facing the state? Water supply and drought tops the list among Californians (38%), followed by air pollution (13%). The proportion of residents naming drought and water supply as the top issue has dropped 20 points since July 2015 (58%). Nonetheless, 62 percent of residents and 71 percent of likely voters say the supply of water is a big problem in their part of the state. Residents in the Central Valley (71%) are the most likely to hold this view and those in the San Francisco Bay Area (51%) are the least likely. Now that statewide mandatory water reduction targets have been lifted, residents are asked to assess government action on the drought. Majorities (58% adults, 63% likely voters) say state and local governments are not doing enough to respond.

“Water supply continues to top the list of environmental issues facing California even after an El Niño year,” Baldassare said. “With water restrictions lifted, many Californians are still calling for state and local governments to do more in responding to the drought.”

Many See Water, Air Pollution as Health Threats in Lower-Income Areas

Asked about pollution of drinking water, 59 percent of Californians and 48 percent of likely voters say it is a more serious health threat in lower-income areas in their part of the state. Latinos (76%), African Americans (65%), and Asian Americans (61%) are more likely than whites (46%) to express this view.

On the topic of air pollution, majorities (60% adults, 60% likely voters) say it is a big problem or somewhat of a problem in their part of the state. Latinos (68%) and African Americans (62%) are more likely than whites (54%) and Asian Americans (51%) to call it a problem. Half of adults (50%) and 42 percent of likely voters say air pollution is a more serious health threat in lower-income areas than elsewhere in their part of the state. Latinos (65%) are more likely than Asian Americans and African Americans (52% each) to express this view and far more likely than whites (37%). And 53 percent of residents say air pollution is a very serious or somewhat serious threat to themselves and their immediate families. Among racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (62%) and African Americans (61%) are the most likely to hold this view.

“Many Californians perceive that lower-income communities face more serious health threats from air and water pollution,” Baldassare said. “Latino residents are the most likely to express these concerns.”

Click here to read the full survey report.

Dropcountr is asking for your feedback

From Dropcountr:

dropcountrDropcountr is surveying utility staff about common pain points, and raffling $50 Amazon gift cards for feedback. It only takes three minutes to complete, so about as long as it takes to read this post =)

Dropcountr encourages sharing with colleagues and peers as appropriate. You can find the survey here.
Dropcountr also recently rebuilt the CLEAR platform to help staff identify Summertime customer behavior trends.

Notice of Proposed Emergency Regulatory Action – Groundwater Sustainability Plans and Alternatives

From the Department of Water Resources:

NEW_DWR_LOGO_14inchThe California Department of Water Resources (Department) proposes this emergency rulemaking action under the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) to make the GSP emergency regulations effective.  The emergency regulations specify the information required to comply with Water Code Section 10733.2, which outlines the process that local agencies shall follow when preparing GSPs and Alternatives. The emergency regulations also identify the methodology and criteria that will be applied by the Department when evaluating and assessing GSPs and Alternatives. The Department proposes to include these emergency regulations into the California Code of Regulations, Title 23, Division 2, Chapter 1.5, Subchapter 2.

Under the APA, Government Code Section 11346.1, Subdivision (a)(2), requires that, at least five (5) working days prior to submission of the proposed emergency action to the Office of Administrative Law (OAL), the adopting agency provide a notice of the proposed emergency action to every person who has filed a request for notice of regulatory action with the agency. After submission of the emergency regulations to OAL, it shall allow interested persons five (5) calendar days to submit comments on the emergency regulations as set forth in Government Code Section 11349.6.  Upon submission, OAL will have ten (10) calendar days within which to process the emergency regulations. The emergency regulations will become effective when OAL files the regulations with the Secretary of State.

The specific language of the Department’s emergency regulations and Finding of Emergency are attached and are also posted on the Department’s website at:  http://www.water.ca.gov/groundwater/sgm/gsp.cfm

 

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About News Worth Noting:  News Worth Noting is a collection of press releases, media statements, and other materials produced by federal, state, and local government agencies, water agencies, and academic institutions, as well as non-profit and advocacy organizations.  News Worth Noting also includes relevant legislator statements and environmental policy and legal analyses that are publicly released by law firms.  If your agency or organization has an item you would like included here, please email it to Maven.

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