Daily Digest: Court rules that sale of Delta islands can proceed; Valley groups, feds seek funds to build Temperance Flat dam; Fighting drought will be a long-term battle, study says; and more …

In California water news today, Court rules that sale of Delta islands can proceed; Valley groups, feds seek funds to build Temperance Flat dam; Fighting drought will be a long-term battle, study says; Sacramento River Temperature Plan preserves salmon and ag releases, feds say; California takes regulatory steps towards DPR; and more …

 

In the news today …

Court rules that sale of Delta islands can proceed:  “The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California’s $175 million purchase of five islands in the heart of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta has been cleared to move forward, even as legal challenges continue.  On Thursday, the 3rd District Court of Appeal lifted a temporary stay order it had issued in June that briefly prevented the sale from closing. A coalition of environmental groups and local water districts, along with San Joaquin and Contra Costa counties, had requested the stay as part of a broader lawsuit challenging the sale. ... ”  Read more from the Sacramento Bee here:  Court rules that sale of Delta islands can proceed

Valley groups, feds seek funds to build Temperance Flat dam:  “A coalition of local elected officials, water districts, tribal members and the federal government will gather Friday to launch the application process to help build Temperance Flat Dam and Reservoir project.  Members of the newly formed San Joaquin Valley Water Infrastructure Authority will work with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to complete the funding application for the proposed water project on the San Joaquin River, in the Sierra foothills east of Friant Dam.  The two groups will sign a memorandum of understanding Friday outside the Old Fresno County Courthouse overlooking Millerton Lake. … ”  Read more from the Sacramento Bee here:  Valley groups, feds seek funds to build Temperance Flat dam

Fighting drought will be a long-term battle, study says: The California drought is now in its fifth year. But what if we told you it could take four more years to get out of it?  That’s the alarming result of a study published June 21 in Geophysical Research Letters. The study analyzed California’s mountain snowpack to assess the severity of the current drought and compare it to past water shortages. The study found that the current drought is, without question, the worst ever recorded in the state as measured by the “deficit” in the snowpack and the crucial freshwater it provides to the state. And largely because of its long duration, it will also likely take several years of winter storms to make up that deficit – 4.4 years, to be exact.... ”  Read more from Water Deeply here:  Fighting drought will be a long-term battle, study says

Sacramento River Temperature Plan preserves salmon and ag releases, feds say: Federal officials on June 29 released a temperature management plan for the Sacramento River that schedules releases from Shasta Lake in a way they believe provides adequate temperatures for winter-run Chinook salmon without cutting farm water deliveries.  The Sacramento River Temperature Management Plan lays out how the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation operates Shasta Dam and other federal reservoirs. The plan outlines a water release schedule intended to preserve cool water temperatures for winter-run Chinook salmon, while meeting water deliveries for Central Valley farmers during the growing season. … ”  Read more from ACWA’s Water News here:  Sacramento River Temperature Plan preserves salmon and ag releases, feds say

California takes regulatory steps towards DPR:  “California is developing new regulations for wastewater that may permit direct potable reuse (DPR), expanding on the momentum of popular indirect reuse programs.  The effort comes amid the state’s persistent drought. The U.S. Drought Monitor says no area of the state is completely rid of abnormally-dry conditions despite the repeal of conservation mandates in May.  Indirect potable reuse (IPR) is also getting a regulatory boost. The State Water Resources Control Board adopted new rules in June aiming to simplify regulations for water agencies pursuing these projects, according to KQED. ... ”  Read more from Water Online here:  California takes regulatory steps towards DPR

SB 1298 clears Assembly Local Government Committee:  “Scaled-down legislation aimed at addressing Proposition 218 concerns was approved in the Assembly Local Government Committee Wednesday on a 5-3 vote.  SB 1298 (Hertzberg) was approved with amendments that reduce the scope of the bill to address stormwater issues only. Other provisions related to lifeline rates and conservation rates were eliminated with the most recent amendments. ... ”  Read more from ACWA’s Water News here:  SB 1298 clears Assembly Local Government Committee

In regional news and commentary today …

Watch out for colder, faster flows on the American River: The lower American River is going to get a gush of cold, swift water over the holiday weekend.  Starting Friday, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation will increase flows below Folsom and Nimbus dams from 4,000 cubic feet per second to 4,500. The flows will increase to 5,000 cfs on Tuesday.  Officials urge those boating, fishing and swimming to be mindful of safety as the flows will be swifter and colder. … ”  Read more from the Sacramento Bee here:  Watch out for colder, faster flows on the American River

Woodland residents complaining about brown water after source switch:Complaints about brown tap water have Woodland city engineers flushing water mains.  The completion of a new multimillion dollar-water plant recently converted homes from ground to surface water.  When Eliesar Rodriguez turned on the faucet to brush his teeth, sandy stuff flowed out. … ”  Read more from CBS News here:  Woodland residents complaining about brown water after source switch

Water level plummets at New Melones: The water level dropped another foot last week at New Melones Reservoir. Unfortunately, it appears that water releases are greater than the inflow. It’s looking like the water will not reach the Tuttletown ramp this year.  Despite this, one launch ramp is open at Glory Hole Point and fish are being caught. Trolling anglers are catching some nice trout at 20 to 40 feet with shad pattern lures, as well as on kokanee lures.  Big Fish winner at Glory Hole Sports last week was Bob James, of Murphys, with a 2-pound rainbow that hit a Rapala lure. ... ”  Read more from the Union Democrat here:  Water level plummets at New Melones

Arroyo Grande voters to consider buying water from the state: In light of the ongoing drought and historically low water levels at Lopez Lake, Arroyo Grande will ask its voters an important question this November: Should the city be allowed to buy water from the state during water emergencies?  The Arroyo Grande City Council voted unanimously at its meeting Tuesday night to place such a measure on the Nov. 8 general election ballot.  “My dad always said, ‘Better to have and not want, than to want and not have,’ and I think that’s a really good way to put this,” Councilwoman Barbara Harmon said. “It is prudent, it is forward-thinking.” ... ”  Read more from the San Luis Obispo Tribune here:  Arroyo Grande voters to consider buying water from the state

 

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

 

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

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