Daily Digest: Judge refuses to halt Delta land sale to Metropolitan; Almond industry’s growth continues despite drought; Silicon Valley’s biggest drought lessons; Endangered Santa Ana River fish to get new homes

In California water news today, Judge refuses to halt Delta land sale to Metropolitan; Almond industry’s growth continues despite drought; Marin water supply report sees no urgent need for desalination; Silicon Valley’s biggest drought lessons; Endangered Santa Ana River fish to get new homes

In the news today …

Judge refuses to halt Delta land sale to Metropolitan:  “A judge has refused to block a Southern California water agency’s controversial purchase of five islands in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.  Judge Barbara Kronlund in San Joaquin Superior Court declined to grant a temporary restraining order Friday to officials from San Joaquin and Contra Costa counties, who sued two weeks ago to keep the Metropolitan Water District from completing its $175 million purchase of the five islands.  Kronlund’s ruling doesn’t end the litigation, however. The deal’s opponents, including two environmental groups, will press the judge for a preliminary injunction halting the purchase at a May 19 hearing. Because Metropolitan doesn’t plan to complete the purchase until June, the May 19 hearing will prove pivotal, said Jonas Minton of the Planning and Conservation League, one of the environmental groups that joined the litigation. ... ”  Read more from the Sacramento Bee here:  Judge refuses to halt Delta land sale to Metropolitan

Almond industry’s growth continues despite drought:  “Despite California’s drought, almond growers expanded their orchards by an estimated 60,000 acres in 2015, marking the 12th consecutive year of growth for the crop, which now covers more than 1.1 million acres, or more than any other fruit, nut or vegetable crop in the state.  Why? Because almonds make money.  While recognizing the ongoing drought may constrain current and future planting, industry experts said that almonds and other tree nuts provided a good return for farmers, who responded by putting more trees in the ground. … ”  Read more from the Stockton Record here:  Almond industry’s growth continues despite drought

Marin water supply report sees no urgent need for desalination:  “A precipitous drop in water use in Marin over the last decade has rendered the need for a desalination plant virtually non-existent.  The Marin Municipal Water District has released its draft 2015 Urban Water Management Plan, a long-range report submitted to the state Department of Water Resources every five years. The state requires it of larger water providers.  The report concludes that barring a major drought the “district has adequate supply to meet future demand through 2040 in average years and in the first two years of a multiple-year drought.” … ”  Read more from the Marin Independent Journal here:  Marin water supply report sees no urgent need for desalination

Silicon Valley’s biggest drought lessons:  “Anyone who has ever flown into San Francisco International Airport has likely spotted South San Francisco thanks to the huge sign on its hillside proclaiming it “The Industrial City.” It’s a remnant of the days before World War II when the city was home to meatpacking operations, steel plants, smelters and other manufacturing.  South San Francisco today is known for its biotech businesses, suburban housing and much lighter industry. It’s also greening up its image, thanks in part to work done by its Parks Department. In response to statewide conservation mandates from Gov. Jerry Brown last year, the city cut its municipal water use by 57 percent in 2015 over 2013 levels and saved about 53 million gallons (200 million liters) of water. … ”  Read more from Water Deeply here:  Silicon Valley’s biggest drought lessons

Endangered Santa Ana River fish to get new homes: The rushing sound of the mountain stream calls from a distance.  After a few dozen yards of boulder scrambling, the clarity of the water is startling as it washes over rocks so clean they look as though they have been scrubbed.  The peaceful, remote canyon along the Upper Santa Ana River is one of eight sites being studied for reintroducing the federally endangered Santa Ana sucker.  “This will be the first time a native fish has been reintroduced in Southern California, said Heather Dyer, water resources manager for the San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District, who is quarterbacking this historic scientific effort with federal and state wildlife officials, numerous consultants and governmental and non-governmental agencies. … ”  Read more from the San Bernardino Sun here:  Endangered Santa Ana River fish to get new homes

More news and commentary in the weekend edition …

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

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