Daily Digest: Is the Silicon Valley key to the Delta tunnels plan?; Cities look for new ways to meet the demand for water supplies; Rejuvenated Shasta Lake is back as top tourist destination; and more …

In California water news today, Is the Silicon Valley key to the Delta tunnels plan?; Cities look for new ways to meet the demand for water supplies; Rejuvenated Shasta Lake is back as top tourist destination; Water rates to rise this summer for most Sonoma County residents; Thousands of Sierra trees getting cut to prepare for summer; Big cuts to the Central Arizona Project coming as three-state agreement nears; and more …

In the news today …

Is the Silicon Valley key to the Delta tunnels plan?  “Santa Clara County depends heavily on water imported through the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, which is why the county’s wholesale water provider is one of a few water districts in Northern California that may participate in an expensive plan to build new water conveyance tunnels under the Delta. … Silicon Valley residents may think of themselves as Northern Californians, but when it comes to water supply, they actually have more in common with Southern Californians. As of right now, Santa Clara Valley Water District – the water wholesaler for Santa Clara County that provides water for nearly 2 million people – is weighing whether or not to participate in California Water Fix, which has a hefty price tag. The district’s decision could affect more than just Silicon Valley. … ”  Read more from Water Deeply here:  Is the Silicon Valley key to the Delta tunnels plan?

Cities look for new ways to meet the demand for water supplies:  “A quarter-century ago, San Diego and its suburbs imported 95% of their water supplies. Thanks to investments in desalination and other efforts to boost supplies, that figure has already dropped to 57% and is projected to fall to just 18% sometime in the next two decades.  San Diego has gone from being one of the most vulnerable areas of California during drought to one of the best prepared—and in so doing has become a model for the future of water use in cities. Even as water supplies have dwindled in many other parts of California during the current drought, San Diego has stockpiled enough to help replenish a local reservoir. The turnabout came, local officials say, after San Diego faced mandatory cutbacks of as much as 50% during another severe drought in 1991. ... ”  Read more from the Wall Street Journal here:  Cities look for new ways to meet the demand for water supplies

Rejuvenated Shasta Lake is back as top tourist destination:  “Dusk’s light cast a refracted glow across the water. As we nestled our boat into a cove at Shasta Lake, it was difficult to believe this was the same place as just four months earlier.  The surface was a mirror. Pines and fresh-budded oaks reflected across emerald water. Deep in the cove, high water flooded willows that had grown for years on barren lakebed. The slopes were coated with fresh grass. The air was filled with the calls of songbirds. … ”  Read more from SF Gate here: Rejuvenated Shasta Lake is back as top tourist destination

Water rates to rise this summer for most Sonoma County residents:  “Water rates for 386,000 Sonoma County residents are set to go up July 1, an increase driven by residential and commercial customers actually saving water.  Customers who receive water from Sonoma County Water Agency can expect rates to go up between 2 to 3 percent, which equates to an increase of 50 cents to $2 per month. The increases cover residential and commercial customers in Santa Rosa, Petaluma, Rohnert Park, Windsor, Sonoma, Cotati and those served by the Valley of the Moon Water District, all of whom receive water from the agency. … ”  Read more from the Sonoma Press Democrat here:  Water rates to rise this summer for most Sonoma County residents

Thousands of Sierra trees getting cut to prepare for summer:  “Once bathed in deep green, the forests in the foothills and Sierra east of the San Joaquin Valley are increasingly turning reddish-brown as drought- and beetle-weary trees die by the month.  It is a somber warning of a potentially dangerous summer.  That ominous unnatural color reveals the homes of Western bark beetles, who bore into ponderosa pines, their tree of choice, and carve tiny pathways into drought-stricken trees that possess too little sap to eject the insects, as they had before the drought. … ”  Read more from the Fresno Bee here:  Thousands of Sierra trees getting cut to prepare for summer

Big cuts to the Central Arizona Project coming as three-state agreement nears:  “Arizona, California and Nevada negotiators are moving toward a major agreement triggering cuts in Colorado River water deliveries to Southern and Central Arizona to avert much more severe cuts in the future.  As state water officials now envision the agreement, it would also ultimately require California to cut its use of river water. That’s despite a 48-year-old law that says the Central Arizona Project must relinquish all its supply during shortages before California loses any. … ”  Read more from the Arizona Daily Star here:  Big cuts to the Central Arizona Project coming as three-state agreement nears

The role of the worm in wastewater:  “Water, as we all know, is a terrible thing to waste. But for businesses that go through a lot of water—dairy farmers, wineries and sewage plants—vast quantities of wastewater is an unfortunate byproduct.  But since 1995, Chilean company BioFiltro has recycled more than 28 billion gallons of water to date with this humble organism: the worm. … ”  Read more from EcoWatch here:  The role of the worm in wastewater

In commentary today …

Lawmakers pump the brakes after Jerry Brown goes full throttle on pet projects:  George Skelton writes,Gov. Jerry Brown’s two very pricey legacy projects took hits in the Legislature last week. They were light jabs, and he didn’t even flinch.  But the fact that some fellow Democrats had the temerity to challenge the popular governor was a sign of growing legislative — and public — skepticism about these highly controversial pet projects.  One legislative committee advanced a bill that would force the Brown administration to be more open and candid about the $64-billion, zigzagging bullet train.  Another panel approved a bill that would require a public vote before the state could gouge two mammoth, $15.5-billion water tunnels under the environmentally fragile Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. … ”  Read more from the LA Times here:  Lawmakers pump the brakes after Jerry Brown goes full throttle on pet projects

More news and commentary in the weekend edition …

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

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