Daily Digest: Delta tunnels plan faces new hurdle; Saudi purchase of CA land fuels debate over water rights; Granite Bay says it will no longer follow state conservation mandate; Feds say fishermen holding science hostage; and more …

In California water news today, Jerry Brown’s $17 billion Delta tunnels plan faces new hurdle – a leading taxpayers organization; Saudi purchase of California land fuels debate over water rights; Granite Bay water district says it will no longer follow state water conservation mandate; Was March the rainfall miracle we were hoping for?; Tiburon shoreline sites targeted for clean up of toxic pilings; Fishermen hold science hostage, feds say; Merced Irrigation District board to vote on water for farmers; Warmer weather means less frost on the Central Coast

In the news today …

Jerry Brown’s $17 billion Delta tunnels plan faces new hurdle – a leading taxpayers organization: In a development that casts significant doubt on whether Silicon Valley’s largest water district will help pay for Gov. Jerry Brown’s $17 billion Delta tunnels plan, a majority of Santa Clara Valley Water District board members now say they want to put the issue to a public vote.  The district, which provides 1.9 million residents of Santa Clara County drinking water and flood protection, has been a key player in Brown’s controversial plan. Its share of the tunnels project could cost up to $1.2 billion. ... ”  Read more from the Daily Democrat here:  Jerry Brown’s $17 billion Delta tunnels plan faces new hurdle – a leading taxpayers organization

Saudi purchase of California land fuels debate over water rights:  “Saudi Arabia’s largest dairy company will soon be unable to farm alfalfa in its own parched country to feed its 170,000 cows. So it’s turning to an unlikely place to grow the water-chugging crop — the drought-stricken American Southwest.  Almarai Co. bought land in January that roughly doubled its holdings in California’s Palo Verde Valley, an area that enjoys first dibs on water from the Colorado River. The company also acquired a large tract near Vicksburg, Arizona, becoming a powerful economic force in a region that has fewer well-pumping restrictions than other parts of the state. … ”  Read more from the San Jose Mercury News here:  Saudi purchase of California land fuels debate over water rights

Granite Bay water district says it will no longer follow state water conservation mandate:  “Pointing to improved conditions at Folsom Lake, a water district serving one of the region’s wealthiest areas announced Friday that it would not follow conservation targets mandated by the state this year and would instead ask its customers to voluntarily cut water use by 10 percent.  The San Juan Water District provides water to about 32,000 retail customers near Folsom Lake, including the community of Granite Bay. Its customers consistently use more water per capita than the customers of any other water district in the region, though they also sharply reduced their use during the last nine months, state figures show. ... ”  Read more from the Sacramento Bee here:  Granite Bay water district says it will no longer follow state water conservation mandate

Was March the rainfall miracle we were hoping for?  “Yes, the Bay Area got a lot of rain this winter. But was it enough to end the drought?  Sadly, no. But there’s good news—this winter was the best we’ve had in five years in terms of precipitation. Rainfall in most Bay Area cities is about 100 percent of normal. San Francisco has received 21 inches of rain this winter, up from 16 inches last year. … ”  Read more from KQED here:  Was March the rainfall miracle we were hoping for?

Tiburon shoreline sites targeted for clean up of toxic pilings:  “A former Tiburon resort that was a scene of frolicking families more than a century ago is now a site of toxic debris and poisoned fish embryos.  What is left of the resort — El Campo — are creosote-soaked, derelict pilings that supported a ferry landing just north of what is now Paradise Park. The Paradise Park Marina constructed near the old El Campo site in early 1960s and abandoned a few years later also contributed to the toxic pilings total, according to state officials. … ”  Read more from the Marin Independent Journal here:  Tiburon shoreline sites targeted for clean up of toxic pilings

Fishermen hold science hostage, feds say: Two fishermen who found a piece of scientific equipment off the coast of Monterey are holding it hostage, interfering with international research, and demanding $45,000 ransom for its return, the federal government claims in court.  The United States sued Daniel Sherer, Patrick Anderson and their business, A&S Fisheries, in Federal Court on Friday, accusing them of holding government property “de facto hostage” and causing irreparable harm to an international research project.  The “oceanographic mooring buoy,” known as Scientific Mooring MS1, was one of several anchored to the seafloor to record data on the velocity, temperature, salinity and sediment concentration of ocean currents. … ”  Read more from the Courthouse News Service here:  Fishermen hold science hostage, feds say

Merced Irrigation District board to vote on water for farmers:  “The Merced Irrigation District’s board of directors is expected to decide on Tuesday how much water the water agency will deliver to farmers for the upcoming irrigation season.  The board’s operating budget tentatively has determined 275,000 acre-feet of surface water to be sold at $66 per acre-foot. That’s an increase of about 100,000 acre-feet from MID’s draft budget.  In a typical irrigation season, MID allocates about 500,000 acre-feet. ... ”  Read more from the Merced Sun-Star here:  Merced Irrigation District board to vote on water for farmers

Warmer weather means less frost on the Central Coast: The whirling noise of wind machines in the vineyards late at night and early in the morning hours often kept me awake in Sonoma County, where I grew up.  Needless to say, the mere mention of frost at this time of the year can cause many to look for cardboard boxes and old sheets to cover their newly sprouted plants.  Viticulturists closely monitor local weather stations throughout the night for indications of possible frost. Because of the well-above-normal temperatures this year, many of our vineyards are reporting bud break, and the young shoots are vulnerable to frost damage. … ”  Read more from the San Luis Obispo Tribune here:  Warmer weather means less frost on the Central Coast

In commentary today …

Congress should stop blocking restoration of the Klamath River, say Jared Huffman and Raul Grijalva:  They write, “On the cusp of commencing one of the most significant river restoration projects in history – a project that would remove four old dams that have diminished water quality and harmed salmon migrating along the mighty Klamath River – it is disappointing that some of our Republican colleagues continue to stand in the way of progress.  For years, we have supported a balanced deal to resolve conflicts on the Klamath. We have supported the efforts of the states of California and Oregon, the private owner of the Klamath dams, numerous Indian tribes, local governments, fishermen, farmers and environmentalists to develop a reasonable water management plan. But after decades of conflict and years of negotiation, the dam-removal deal negotiated by the affected parties was jeopardized when House Republicans refused to even introduce legislation to honor the deal before a crucial deadline last year. ... ”  Read more from the Sacramento Bee here:  Congress should stop blocking restoration of the Klamath River

More news and commentary in the weekend edition …

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

Sign up for daily email service and you’ll never miss a post …

Daily emailsSign up for free daily email service and you’ll get all the Notebook’s aggregated and original water news content delivered to your email box by 9AM. And with breaking news alerts, you’ll always be one of the first to know …


About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: