Daily Digest: Climate change may have a big impact on American Indian tribes out West; Property tax increase proposed for Sacramento River levee fixes; SoCal turf rebates could disappear; Lawsuits in three states target groundwater pollution under the Clean Water Act

Happy Presidents Day!
In California water news today, Climate change may have a big impact on American Indian tribes out West; Big opposition to waste sorting facility near Stony Creek in Glenn County; Lake Sonoma steelhead festival offers close look at powerful fish; Sacramento: Property tax increase proposed for levee fixes; Metropolitan proposes slashing its conservation budget; turf removal rebates could disappear; Lawsuits in three states target groundwater pollution under the Clean Water Act

In the news today …

Climate change may have a big impact on American Indian tribes out West:  “It isn’t necessarily news that the California drought has reached near biblical proportions, but it may surprise many Americans to learn that the effects are spreading into neighboring states and will not only have consequences for the agricultural community, but for many other livelihoods as well. Despite record precipitation and snow pack, drought is still on the minds of environmental scientists, and one group that is a focal point of concern for some is the American Indian community. For them, climate change could plague them profoundly and for generations to come.  Research presented on Saturday at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., told of the possible hard times to come for western American Indians. … ”  Read more from Inquistr here:  Climate change may have a big impact on American Indian tribes out West

Big opposition to waste sorting facility near Stony Creek in Glenn County: The main reason opponents say they disapprove of a waste processing facility along Stony Creek near the Sacramento River is that the risk of polluting groundwater and river water is too high.  The Glenn County Planning Commission will review the proposal during a public hearing at 9 a.m. Wednesday at 9 a.m. … On the table is a proposal by KVB Inc., for what is known as a “MRF,” a materials recovery facility.  MRFs are set up to sift through materials that might otherwise end up in a landfill. … ”  Read more from the Chico Enterprise-Record here:  Big opposition to waste sorting facility near Stony Creek in Glenn County

Lake Sonoma steelhead festival offers close look at powerful fish: Steelhead trout are tough, ocean- going fish and they seemed to affirm that in the way they came slamming through the trap door Saturday into a square elevator of water at the fish hatchery below Lake Sonoma.  “They’re strong and they’re very hardy,” said Danny Garcia, a state Fish and Wildlife technician supervising operations at the Don Clausen Hatchery at Warm Springs Dam.  “That’s probably why they got the name steelhead,” he said, smiling, “but don’t quote me on that.” ... ”  Read more from the Santa Rosa Press Democrat here:  Lake Sonoma steelhead festival offers close look at powerful fish

Sacramento: Property tax increase proposed for levee fixes:  “Sacramento flood-control officials plan to ask landowners for more money to improve the city’s levees, amounting to an average $42 increase in property taxes.  The work is needed primarily to prevent seepage through levees along the Sacramento River from downtown south to Freeport. Plans also include doubling the size of the Sacramento Weir, located along the Sacramento River near the Interstate 80 overpass, to divert more floodwaters into the Yolo Bypass.  These projects are required following regulatory changes in 2013 by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which imposed stricter control over river seepage through levee foundations. … ”  Read more from the Sacramento Bee here:  Property tax increase proposed for levee fixes

Southern California: Metropolitan proposes slashing its conservation budget; turf removal rebates could disappear:  “When Gov. Jerry Brown ordered a 25% cut in urban water use last year — and singled out lawns as a prime target — Southern Californians began replacing turf in record numbers, motivated in part by cash rebates.  Marveling at the success of the program, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California officials quickly went all in, boosting the turf rebate budget to $340 million.  In the upcoming fiscal year, however, there may not be an MWD-funded turf removal program at all. … ”  Read more from the LA Times here:  Metropolitan proposes slashing its conservation budget; turf removal rebates could disappear

Lawsuits in three states target groundwater pollution under the Clean Water Act: The Clean Water Act, the landmark environmental statue that Congress passed in 1972, does not explicitly regulate the pollution of groundwater. That could change. Lawsuits before federal courts in three states argue that the federal government does have the power to hold polluters accountable — if the groundwater eventually flows into a river, lake, ocean, or stream already under Clean Water Act jurisdiction.  The cases — in U.S. district courts in Hawaii, North Carolina, and Virginia — are geographically diverse. Yet together, they represent a collision between federal water law and hydrological reality. There is no scientific dispute that, in many circumstances, groundwater is connected to rivers. Yet Congress did not mention groundwater when writing the act that is intended to prevent pollution of the nation’s waters. … ”  Read more from the Circle of Blue here:  Lawsuits in three states target groundwater pollution under the Clean Water Act

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

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