Daily Digest: True to its name, El Niño effect comes in time for Christmas; Folsom rises 12+ feet in 2 days; Sidetracked salmon rescued, released into the Sacramento River; and more …

In California water news today, True to its name, El Niño effect comes in time for Christmas; Lake Shasta level lags behind rainfall; By the numbers: The latest on the drought; Folsom rises 12+ feet in 2 days; Sidetracked salmon rescued, released into the Sacramento River; Biologists trap wayward salmon near Woodland; Valley farmers still concerned, despite wet weather; and more …

In the news today …

True to its name, El Niño effect comes in time for Christmas:Living up to its name, El Niño will be bringing cold, wet weather to Southern California — just in time for Christmas.  Much of the region can expect some showers on Thursday and Christmas Day, according to the National Weather Service. Meteorologist Brett Albright — a wise man on the subject — said El Niño is the star:  “The important thing to keep in mind is that really all the storms that we’re gonna see this winter have at least some small influence from El Niño,” Albright said. “It’s a global phenomenon really. So it acts on a very large scale.” … ”  Read more from KPCC here: True to its name, El Niño effect comes in time for Christmas

Lake Shasta level lags behind rainfall: Rainfall totals for Redding are running nearly twice the normal rate for this time of year, sending runoff into drought-parched streams and reservoirs.  But so far, the rain hasn’t made a big difference in the water level at Lake Shasta, about 23 feet lower than at this time last year.  There are a couple reasons why the water level hasn’t kept up with the rising rainfall total, said Don Bader, deputy area manager for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, which operates Shasta Dam. ... ”  Read more from the Redding Record Searchlight here:  Lake Shasta level lags behind rainfall

By the numbers: The latest on the drought: The range of measures used to explain the California drought can be confusing. Here’s a simple summary of some of the most important drought numbers, from well failures to grants for water-system improvements, together with an idea of how these figures have changed as the crisis has developed. Every two weeks, the California Office of Emergency Services publishes an official “drought update” highlighting important changes in water supply, emergency assistance, fire risk and other factors. ... ”  Read more from Water Deeply here:  By the numbers: The latest on the drought

Folsom rises 12+ feet in 2 days:  “The wet weather this week in northern California left many Christmas travelers worried, and water experts smiling. Folsom Lake has gone up nearly 13 feet in just two days. … ”  Read more from Channel 10 here: Folsom Lake rises 12+ feet in 2 days

Sidetracked salmon rescued, released into the Sacramento River: Operation Salmon Rescue is in full swing in Yolo County, where hundreds of the endangered fish are getting a second shot at life.  Since as early as this past September, the state Department of Fish and Wildlife has teamed up with both local and regional organizations to capture hordes of fully grown late fall and winter run salmon along the Colusa Basin Drain in the Yolo Bypass, who have strayed from their natural migration patterns into dead-end drainage canals. … ”  Read more from the Daily Democrat here:  Sidetracked salmon rescued, released into the Sacramento River

Biologists trap wayward salmon near Woodland: State biologist Mike Eikan got a workout on Wednesday as he hauled bags filled with water and flopping salmon 100 yards up a muddy hill.  “Man, that’s a big one,” he said with a grunt as he hoisted a bag with a 40-pound, hook-jawed male Chinook into a bubbling tank towed on a trailer behind a pickup.  Eikan and a team of fisheries biologists were busy Wednesday at a large drainage ditch near the Sacramento River in the Yolo Bypass in what’s become an annual routine during the state’s drought. … ”  Read more from the Sacramento Bee here:  Biologists trap wayward salmon near Woodland

Valley farmers still concerned, despite wet weather: Many Californians have high hopes for a wet winter, but it may not help Valley growers as much as they’d like.  More water is now flowing through Merced’s Bear Creek from the recent rain, and our local mountains are covered in several inches of fresh snow. But some experts say with the design and regulations of our state’s current water system, too much of the runoff will end up in the ocean. That means even a very wet winter most likely won’t do enough to help valley farmers recover from the drought. … ”  Read more from ABC Channel 30 here:  Valley farmers still concerned, despite wet weather

Precipitation watch …

From the National Weather Service: “A cold Pacific frontal system will be sweeping through Northern California today and tonight. This will bring valley rain and low elevation snow to the North state. Snow levels will be as low as 1000 feet over Shasta county and as low as 1500 to 2000 feet over the coast range and northern Sierra. The precipitation should end by late Christmas morning most areas.

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

hard_working_on_computer_anim_150_clr_7364Maven’s Notebook
The diary of a confessed obsessive-compulsive California water news junkie

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