Daily Digest: The future of water: How hot, dry, and crowded will CA get by 2040?; Scientists say it hasn’t been this dry in 500 years; Waterfowl not cleared for landing; Wet weather on the way; and more …

In California water news today, The future of water: How hot, dry, and crowded will California get by 2040?; Scientists say it’s been 500 years since California has been this dry; Waterfowl aren’t cleared for landing in golden-brown state; Drought a factor in rapid growth of wildfires; Catalyst California series sketches blueprint for drought response; Southern California agencies join together to raise awareness of water conservation; and Study: Colorado River shortage could hit Arizona hard

In the news today …

The future of water: How hot, dry, and crowded will California get by 2040?  “Even if California gets heavy El Niño rains this winter, the current drought has delivered a wake-up call to state leaders. The message?  Our current water habits are unsustainable.   Over the coming decades, experts say California’s climate will get hotter and drier — all while the state adds millions of new residents.  To help make sense of the challenges to come, KPCC is using the best data available to imagine what California will look like in the year 2040 and how our relationship to water might change as a result.  … ”  Read more from KPCC here:  The future of water: How hot, dry, and crowded will California get by 2040?

Scientists say it’s been 500 years since California has been this dry:  “Researchers knew California’s drought was already a record breaker when they set out to find its exact place in history, but they were surprised by what they discovered: It has been 500 years since what is now the Golden State has been this dry.  California is in the fourth year of a severe drought with temperatures so high and precipitation so low that rain and snow evaporate almost as soon as it hits the ground. A research paper released Monday said an analysis of blue oak tree rings in the state’s Central Valley showed that weather conditions haven’t been this dire since the 1500s. That was around the time when European explorers landed in what became San Diego, when Columbus set off on a final voyage to the Caribbean, when King Henry VIII was alive. … ”  Read more from the Washington Post here:  Scientists say it’s been 500 years since California has been this dry

Waterfowl aren’t cleared for landing in golden-brown state:At each end of the Duck Highway, two worlds connected by flight are split into a pair of heaven-and-hell landscapes.  Anybody who loves nature probably would be both ecstatic and aghast at the news revealed this past week from these two locations.  Deep in the prairie of Alberta, several members of the California Waterfowl Association ventured into the heart of the richest waterfowl breeding grounds in the hemisphere. They joined waterfowl experts from North Dakota’s Delta Waterfowl Foundation. … Meanwhile, the news is grim for California … ”  Read more from SF Gate here:  Waterfowl aren’t cleared for landing in golden-brown state

Drought a factor in rapid growth of wildfires:  “The Butte Fire in Amador and Calaveras counties increased to more than 50,000 acres in less than 48 hours after it started last week.  The Valley Fire in Lake County doubled overnight to 40,000 acres early Sunday.  Extreme weather conditions and steep topography were factors in the rapid spread of the Butte Fire. ... ”  Read more from Capital Public Radio here:  Drought a factor in rapid growth of wildfires

Catalyst California series sketches blueprint for drought response: Adapting 21st-century society to an era of water scarcity requires an all-hands, all-strategies approach that rewrites outdated laws and policies, boosts local water supplies, maintains or restores ecosystem health, and invests in practices and technologies that increase the productivity of each drop of water, according to experts who participated in the Catalyst: California series of interactive town halls hosted by Circle of Blue and Maestro Conference.  Held over three weeks in August, the Catalyst calls connected public officials, regulators, scientists, farm advocates, and private sector representatives with more than 550 colleagues and members of the public who registered for the three-part series. … ”  Read more from the Circle of Blue here:  Catalyst California series sketches blueprint for drought response

Southern California agencies join together to raise awareness of water conservation:  “Water conservation is critical during California’s ongoing drought, a message that several local water agencies spread on Sunday.  Hundreds gathered at the Descanso Gardens for a seminar that offered residents tips on reducing water use.  “It’s kinda fun  actually,” says Jerri Lamb, a Burbank resident, who is conserving water. … ”  Read more from CBS LA here:  Agencies join together to raise awareness of water conservation

Study: Colorado River shortage could hit Arizona hard: A shortage of Colorado River water would affect Arizona and the Southwest more than many people previously believed, a new study says.  Called “The Bathtub Ring” after Lake Mead’s whitish coating, the study examined potential side effects of a Colorado River supply shortfall. It warns that electricity costs for Hoover Dam power customers would rise sharply, that visitation to Lake Mead could tumble and that California, not just Arizona, would suffer from an early shortage. … ”  Read more from the Arizona Daily Star here:  Study: Colorado River shortage could hit Arizona hard

More news and commentary in the weekend edition …

Daily Digest, weekend edition: San Joaquin Valley irrigation deal reached; Who owns California’s water?; Groundwater adjudication bills sent to Governor’s desk; The blob that attacked California; and more …

Precipitation watch …

weatherEarly season system to arrive on Wednesday: We may have an early season weather system heading our way! A weather system currently situated over Alaska is forecast to move toward Northern California, potentially spreading precipitation south to around the Interstate-80 corridor. Rain amounts of up to 0.33″ will be possible, mainly along the far Northern Sacramento Valley. Snow levels may also drop down to around 7000 ft, meaning possible snow for Lassen Park and perhaps a dusting near Donner Pass. NWS currently believes this will bring rain to the Valley Fire, but not the Butte Fire.”

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

Guest commentary: Reservoir Re-Operation – The Sleeping Giant in Water Supply Development

Upcoming calendar events to note: Coastal Clean Up Day, Summit on Drones & Water Resources Management, 21st solutions to Western Water Woes; Sustainable Groundwater Management Act Public Meetings

Reservoir and water conditions for September 14, 2015

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

hard_working_on_computer_anim_150_clr_7364Maven’s Notebook
The diary of a confessed obsessive-compulsive California water news junkie

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