Daily Digest: The West without water: What can past droughts tell us about tomorrow?, Sacramento’s $2B sewage makeover, Delta dam plans panned, and more …

Happy Presidents Day!
In California water news today, The West without water: what can past droughts tell us about tomorrow?, Sacramento fights ammonia and nitrates with $2 billion sewage makeover, State’s Delta dam plans panned, Poor snow causes Squaw Valley to cancel World Cup event, Recycled water project adds to Fresno water rate debate,  San Diego: Home water use up despite drought, and more …

In the news today …

The West without water: what can past droughts tell us about tomorrow?  “The state of California is beginning its fourth year of a serious drought, with no end in sight.  The majority of water in the western United States is delivered by winter storms from the Pacific, and over the past year, those storms were largely blocked by an enormous ridge of high pressure. A relatively wet December has given way to the driest January on record, and currently over 90 percent of California is in severe to exceptional drought.  The southwestern states are also experiencing moderate to severe drought, and this comes on the heels of a very dry decade. This long drought has crept up on the region, partly because droughts encroach slowly and they lack the visual and visceral effects of other, more immediate natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods, or tsunamis. ... ”  Continue reading at Origins here:  The West without water: what can past droughts tell us about tomorrow?

Sacramento fights ammonia, nitrates with $2 billion sewage makeover:  “Sacramento is launching a major construction project this winter intended to overhaul the city’s sewage system.  “An official groundbreaking ceremony for what has been dubbed the Echo project is scheduled for May, but some preliminary work has already begun. It will employ up to 600 construction workers at its peak, officials said,” KCRA reported. ... ”  Read more from Water Online here:  Sacramento fights ammonia, nitrates with $2 billion sewage makeover

State’s Delta dam plans panned:  “Delta farmers and residents fear that a plan by the state Department of Water Resources to dam three parts of the Delta could force them to stop irrigating, is too costly, and less effective than other solutions.  The rock dams, dubbed “barriers” by the DWR, are supposed to be temporary and supposed to prevent salt water from intruding into the Delta if there’s not enough fresh water to push back.  But next to the Bay Delta Conservation Plan’s twin water tunnels, the cuss word next highest in the Delta dictionary is probably “barriers,” if a meeting last week in Clarksburg is any indication. ... ”  Read more from the Central Valley Business Times here:  State’s Delta dam plans panned

Lake Tahoe: Poor snow causes Squaw Valley to cancel World Cup event: Squaw Valley has canceled a week of World Cup skicross and snowboardcross races in early March due to poor snow levels at the resort, according to the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association.  While Squaw received more than two feet of snow in a wet storm that hit the Sierra a week ago, the amount needed to build the World Cup courses is significant, according to a Friday USSA news release, “and the resort has chosen to allocate its resources to focus solely on the guest experience.” … ”  Read more from the Sacramento Bee here:  Poor snow causes Squaw Valley to cancel World Cup event

Recycled water project adds to Fresno water rate debate: Fresno is turning its sewer farm into a drought-buster.  City Hall has started building the first phase of an advanced treatment plant that will deliver millions of gallons of water every day for non-drinking uses, such as irrigation of green space.  This initial step at the wastewater treatment facility west of town will cost an estimated $100 million and could be ready to go in two years. ... ”  Read more from the Fresno Bee here:  Recycled water adds to Fresno water rate debate

San Diego: Home water use up despite drought:  “Has San Diego County done a good job of conserving water in recent years? It depends on which statistics you look at.  Overall municipal water use — which includes residential, industrial and commercial consumption — dropped by more than 20 percent between 2007 and 2014, according to the San Diego County Water Authority.  But if you focus on homeowners only, the picture is clearly different. … ”  Read more from U-T San Diego here:  Home water use up despite drought

In commentary today …

George Skelton: On train, tunnel, Newsom would change course from Brown: He writes: “In a Gavin Newsom governorship, California’s current bullet train project probably would be derailed.  The delta twin tunnels, as presently envisioned, also likely would be buried.  Those are Gov. Jerry Brown’s two big legacy-builders. But Brown will be termed out after 2018, and Lt. Gov. Newsom’s goal is to succeed him.  The two Democrats see eye-to-eye on many things, but not on the train or the tunnels. ... ”  Read more from the Los Angeles Times here:  George Skelton: On train, tunnel, Newsom would change course from Brown

For more news and commentary, check out the weekend edition of the Daily Digest …

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

hard_working_on_computer_anim_150_clr_7364Maven’s Notebook
The diary of a confessed obsessive-compulsive California water news junkie

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