Blog round-up: Essential elements for a water bond, groundwater policy, water conservation, and more … plus fire, water and basketweaving …

sea splashPlenty of bloggers with plenty to say in this edition of the blog round-up …

Essential Elements for a Water Bond: Caitrin Chappelle and Ellen Hanak write: “In both houses of the California Legislature, multiple versions of a new water bond are being amended and debated to make the June deadline for replacing the $11.1 billion bond now slated for the November election. Originally intended for the November 2010 ballot, the bond has been twice delayed due to concerns it would not pass. The March 2014 PPIC Statewide Survey showed a bump in public approval since last year, with 50 percent of likely voters now saying they would approve it, up from 42 percent in March 2013. Survey responses to other questions about water suggest that this rise in support likely reflects concerns over the drought. For example, a record share of residents (15%) named water as the most important issue facing the state (up from 2% a year earlier).  As the legislature considers the final size and shape of this new bond, it is worth reviewing how bond funds have been used in the past and the areas that most need bond support in the future. … ”  Read more from the PPIC blog here:  Drought Watch: Essential Elements for a Water Bond

Why California groundwater policy must change:It’s often said that California is the only state that doesn’t regulate groundwater, but that’s not exactly true. In California, one rule always applies. Though unwritten, it exists in the form of dogma more powerful than words graven in stone: Any official, at any level, whenever speaking of groundwater, must assert emphatically that local control is the best of all possible alternatives.  No matter that history, science, and current realities provide overwhelming evidence against it, the “local control” dogma reigns supreme.  Here in the San Joaquin Valley, history shows local control has meant nothing good. ... ”  Read more from the Valley Citizen here:  Why California groundwater policy must change

Our Web Poll results: Waiting for hot water is the real national pastime:  “The crack of the bats during the first month of the new baseball season brings a bit of excitement to lots of us who enjoy what was once considered the “national pastime.”  But one activity – repeated more than 200 million times a day – gets far more Americans lathered up than Major League Baseball on the best of days: standing by the shower – passing time – waiting for the water get hot enough to step in.   Back in January, I wrote of NRDC’s efforts to modify the building and plumbing codes for new buildings to cut down on the waste of water, energy, and time waiting for hot water in new homes.  We invited readers to take a web-based poll to report how long they usually waited for hot water before stepping into the shower, and what they usually did during this time. … ”  Read more from the NRDC here:  Our Web Poll results: Waiting for hot water is the real national pastime

New water conservation tool: “Roy Hoggard of Stockton is worried about the drought, so he whipped up a little invention (well, OK, it’s a sticker) called the Hoggard Hesitator. Allow me to explain:  As of a couple of weeks ago, Roy had printed out 1,000 hesitators and handed out about 300 at the Sotckton Earth Day Festival. He even went up to Sacramento to distribute them to legislative staffers.  Roy’s a big proponent of the old adage, “If it’s yellow let it mellow…” etc. … ”  Read more from Alex Breitler’s blog here:  The “Hoggard Hesitator”

Acorns, fire, water, and basketweaving:  North Fork Mono/Chukchansi Yokuts basketmaker Lois Conner Bohna explains the importance of fire to the forest:  ” … In fact, fire is a principal factor in the health of the forest. Fires maintain open meadows, and by altering plant transpiration, evaporation, and the infiltration of snow and rain into the soil, fire affects yet another cycle: the water cycle. Lois cites historical accounts to point out that at one time a network of interconnected meadows laced the entire upper watershed of the San Joaquin River with grasslands and wetlands, extending dozens of miles from the foothills to the crest of the Sierra Nevada. Now, out of some 600 meadows in the Sierra National Forest, only about a half dozen are still functioning well enough to store water far into the summer and slowly release it into streams to help sustain their flow through the driest period of the year. If more fire were applied to meadows, not only would it restore many important basket plants and other cultural plants, but it would also restore the hydrological processes of a healthy watershed. ... ”  So what’s that got to do with basketweaving?  Find out here from the Firelighter blog: Lois Conner Bohna: Acorns, Baskets, Fire, Water, and Learning in California

When water fails: Economic considerations of water scarcity on food, energy and the environment: “California is currently suffering one of the driest years on record and as a persistently water-stressed region all the alarms have been activated. If the drought persists, there may be serious economic consequences for California’s agriculture, which may suffer from a rise in unemployment. Water scarcity will likely decrease hydroelectric power generation affecting electricity prices and indirectly lead to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions from substitutive sources. More broadly, the drought will affect the living standards of most Californian residents, as urban water conservation strategies are implemented through water price increases or even rationing of this valuable resource.  The wide consequences of this severe drought have led to increased attention from both scientists and policy-makers, as it is becoming increasingly clear that water, food, energy and climate systems are highly interdependent. … ”  Read more from the Not Just Water blog here: When water fails: Economic considerations of water scarcity on food, energy and the environment

MWD’s hidden plan for Sacramento River water:When I was going to USC in Los Angeles in the mid-50’s the only thing worse than the smog was the drinking water. The smog would burn your eyes and the water would sear your throat. The bottled-water companies were doing a land office business! The few of us there from Sacramento would brag about how our river water was really good-tasting. Of course, no one believed us.  But after Gov. Pat Brown’s State Water Project (SWP) brought Sacramento River water down to Los Angeles, the Southland quickly developed a taste for it. The Metropolitan Water District took note and soon our river water became known as “sweet” water and there developed a growing demand for it in that dry, desert big city. … ”  Read more from Burt Wilson here: MWD’s hidden plan for Sacramento River water

El Niño and the Colorado River Basin:  “One of the epic Colorado River stories involves the Great El Niño of 1983, the year they almost lost Glen Canyon Dam. With a massive snowpack melting off in a hurry in June of that year, Lake Powell filled to the spillways, which couldn’t handle the load, and it is said we came close to catastrophe. (See John Weisheit, pdf)  As we head into what may be another big El Niño year, can we expect another big snowpack and a Powell-filling runoff? No.  Paul Miller at the Colorado Basin River Forecast Center ran the numbers and sent along this graph of El Niño vs. La Niña and its impact on Colorado River flow … ”  Read more from the Inkstain blog here: El Niño and the Colorado River Basin

And lastly … An edible water bottle?  Eeesh … doesn’t look to edible to me …

Photo credit:  Sea splash, by Scott Anderson

Roy Hoggard of Stockton is worried about the drought, so he whipped up a little invention (well, OK, it’s a sticker) called the Hoggard Hesitator. Allow me to explain:

As of a couple of weeks ago, Roy had printed out 1,000 hesitators and handed out about 300 at the Sotckton Earth Day Festival. He even went up to Sacramento to distribute them to legislative staffers.

Roy’s a big proponent of the old adage, “If it’s yellow let it mellow…” etc.

– See more at: http://blogs.esanjoaquin.com/san-joaquin-river-delta/2014/04/26/the-hoggard-hesitator/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+san-joaquin-river-delta+%28Alex+Breitler%27s+San+Joaquin+Delta%2C+Delta+College+Blog%29#sthash.m76HgtUX.dpuf

Roy Hoggard of Stockton is worried about the drought, so he whipped up a little invention (well, OK, it’s a sticker) called the Hoggard Hesitator. Allow me to explain:

As of a couple of weeks ago, Roy had printed out 1,000 hesitators and handed out about 300 at the Sotckton Earth Day Festival. He even went up to Sacramento to distribute them to legislative staffers.

Roy’s a big proponent of the old adage, “If it’s yellow let it mellow…” etc.

– See more at: http://blogs.esanjoaquin.com/san-joaquin-river-delta/2014/04/26/the-hoggard-hesitator/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+san-joaquin-river-delta+%28Alex+Breitler%27s+San+Joaquin+Delta%2C+Delta+College+Blog%29#sthash.m76HgtUX.dpuf

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